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Thursday

Sant Dnyaneshwar

Posted by bhavi


Sant Dnyaneshwar



In the thirteenth century of the Christian era, the knowledge of the Sanskrit language was getting scarce in Maharashtra, A very minor percentage of the society knew the Sanskrit language and followed the religious and other books written in that language.

The majority of the people of the society were therefore denied the key to religious books or to knowledge. At such a stage in the history of Maharashtra, there arose a very bright star on the horizon of knowledge, who pledged himself to writing in the language of the people, the Marathi Language. 

This star was none else but the Saint Dnyaneshwar who was bold enough to go against the tradi­tions of his times of writing in the Sanskrit language and to use Marathi as the vehicle of his preaching. 

Dnyaneshwar was so very sure about the power of the Marathi language that he writes in Dnyaneshwari that, his highly appreciative readers will surely say that Marathi Language is even sweeter than nectar.

Saturday

Sant Namdeo

Posted by bhavi









Sant Namdeo







Whenever we talk about the Saints of Maharashtra, the name of Dnyaneshwar easily stands the first. However his contemporary Saint Namdeo is also equally important. His place among the Maharashtrian Saints is unique; because unlike most other Maharashtrian :saints he moved far and wide outside Maharashtra for preaching, and even today his followers are found in large numbers in far off places like the Punjab and Haryana.

Like Dnyaneshwar there is no reliable information available about Namdeo, The information that is available is through legends .and also through a number of biographical ' Abhangas' which .are included in the Gatha known after his name; but though over 2000 Abhangas are included in Namdeo's Gatha, we feel that they are compiled by six different persons who were known by the same name viz. Namdeo. We have therefore to accept the information derived from these ' Abhangas' very guardedly, relying only on those that appear to be definitely of Namdeo himself.

Sant Tukaram

Posted by bhavi

Sant Tukaram


image:SantTukaram-image.jpg


Tukaram or Tukoba, constantly sang the praises of lord Vitthala, or Krishna. It was the constant singing about God which led Tukaram to compose his abhangs. It is these abhangs for which Tuka is most famous. 

The abhangs are unique in the world of literature. They are often called poems, but they don't have the artful imagery associated with poems. The abhangs express Tuka's feelings (whether elation or frustration) and philosophical outlook. 

During his 41 years, Tuka composed over 5,000 abhangs. Many of them speak of events in his life, which make them somewhat autobiographical. Yet, they are focused on God and not Tukaram. 

He faced varieties of difficulties with astonishing patience. He refused diamonds and opals offered by Shivaji Maharaj himself. His devotional songs are an invaluable contribution to Marathi spiritual literature.

Sant Eknath

Posted by bhavi

Sant Eknath

 

Sant Eknath (1533 - 1599) was a great admirer of Jnanesvar of the 12th century (or the 13th) who was a great poetic genius and mystic saint of Maharashtra and who established the bhagasvata tradition in Maharashtra.

Jnanesvar's magnum opus was Jnanesvari, the famous commentary in Marathi on the gItA, the most elaborate ever written. It was Eknath who brought out the first authentic edition of Jnanesvari. Eknath was a brahmin, but he set an example by not observing caste distinctions, against which he preached vehemently. His own commentary in 18,800 verses on the eleventh skanda of the Srimad-bhagavatam is called Ekanatha-bhagavatam.

It is not just a spiritual treatise; it is a literary masterpiece. types, massaging the feet, keeping all accessories ready for pujA, fanning the Guru Eknath while he delivered lessons or lectures for his disciples, and so on. At the end of full years by a fortuitous circumstance the unsuspecting Eknath got the revealing news from a total stranger that the lad known as his disciple krishna was none other than the Lord of Dwaraka. But the revelation came just late, because, the Lord, who had stayed in Eknath's house all these years, had just then disappeared.


Sant Eknath is credited with bringing out the first authentic edition of Sant Jnaneshwar’s magnum opus Jnanesvari, the famous commentary of Bhagavad Gita in Marathi. Another major work associated with Sant Eknath is a commentary in 18,800 verses on the eleventh skanda of the Shrimad Bhagavad Purana known as Ekanatha Bhagavatam.


Ekanath believed and taught common people that the way of Bhakti (devotion) is easier than the path of knowledge, but it was sufficient by itself to attain Moksha.

About Eknath’s Teaching from the book Sai Baba of Shirdi by M.V. Kamath and V. B. Kher


As the sun requires no help to dispel darkness, so also bhakti required no external help to destroy avidya (ignorance). Eknath held that intellectual knowledge is unnecessary for God realization.


Eknath illustrated this theory by the example of the milkmaids of Vraja. Those milkmaids were manifestly ignorant of any scriptural knowledge but by loving Him and even acting against the injuctions of the Shastras, they realized their spiritual goal.

Eknath also held that in matters worldly as well as spiritual, the help of the Guru was not only valuable but indispensable. Eknath believed in meditation and insisted that even a single moment spent in meditating upon God could destroy tribulation, disease, obstacles, doubts, sins and egoism.

Friday

GAU-MATA

Posted by bhavi


GAU-MATA



The various parts of the body of the cow in which the deities, the revered sages, the various elements, are believed to dwell are given as follows:

1) Two Horns of the Cow   The Creator 'Brahma'
2) The Head of the Cow   The Deity 'Indra'
3) Forehead of the Cow   The Deity 'Agni
4) Collar of the Cow   The Deity 'Yama'
5) Brain of the Cow   The Deity 'Moon'
6) Upper Jaw of the Cow   The Highest world Dyuloka
7) Lower Jaw of the Cow   The Earth
8  The Tongue   The Lightening
9) The Teeth   The Deity 'Marut'
10) The Throat   The 'Revatee' Constellation
11) The Shoulder   The 'Kritka' Constellation
12) Bones of the Shoulder   The Summer Season
13) All the Organs of the Cow   The Deity 'Vaayu'
14) The Heaven   The World to which cow, belongs
15) The BackBone   The Deity 'Rudra'
16) In the Chest   The Eagle
17) Is the Power & Strength Of the Cow   The Space
18) Hunch of the Cow   The Sage Vrihashpati
19) In the bones of the Chest   The Stanza by the name of Vrihatee
20) The Back   Angels & Fairies
21) Bones of the Ribs   The Hostesses of the Angels & Fairies.
22) The Shoulders   The Deity 'Varuna' and Friend
23) The Forelegs   The Sage 'Tvashta & the sage 'Aryama'
24) The Hindlegs   The Destroyer 'Lord Mahadeva'
25) The Backside of the Cow   The wife of the Deity 'Indra'
26) The Tail   The Deity 'Vaayu'
27) The Hairs of the Body   The Sage 'Pawamana'
28) The Buttock   The Caste 'Brahmin' & The caste'Kshatriya'
29) Lies in the Thighs   The Strength of the Cow.
30) Bones of the Knees   The Deity Sun and the Creator
31) The Calf of the Cow   The Celestial Beings 'Gandharva'
32) In the Smaller Bones   The Celestial Beings 'Apsara'
33) Hooves of the Cow   The Mother of the Sun, God, 'Aditi'
34) In the Heart   The Mind
35) In the Liver of the Cow   The Intelligence
36) The Nerve By the Name Of 'Puritat'   The Religious Vow 'Vrata'
37) The Belly   The Hunger
38) In the Intestines   Goddess Sarswati
39) In the internal part of the intestines   The Mountains
40) In the Ovum   The sorrow (Manyu)
41) In the sense Organs   The Subjects & the People (Praja)
42) In the Ovary   The River
43) In the Breasts   The Deity 'Varuna'
44) In the cells of the Breasts which produce milk   The Thundering clouds
45) In the Skin   The 'All-Pervasive power'
46) In the hairs of the Body,Of the cow   The Various Medicines
47) The Anus   The heavenly & Celestial Beings 'Devagana'
48) In the Intestine   The Man
49) In the Stomach   The Celestial being 'Yaksha'
50) In the Kidney   The Anger
51) In the Blood   The Demon 'Rakshasha'
52) The Appearance of The Cow   The Constellation are
53) In the Stomach   The Other living beings
54) Is the Grossness   The sky
55) In the Bone-Marrow   The Death
56) Is Like Fire   The Posture while sitting
57) Is the Deity 'Ashwinee Kumar   The posture while getting up
58) The Deity 'Indra'   The Posture while standing and facing East
59) The Lord of Death 'Yamaraja'   The Posture while standing and facing South
60) The Creator 'Brahma'   The Posture while standing and facing west
61) The Sun God   The Posture while standing & facing North
62) The Deity Moon   The Cow while Grazing
63) The Friend   The Cow while looking
64) Pure Joy   The Posture of the Cow while turning it back

KAMADHENU MATA

Posted by bhavi





KAMADHENU MATA





KAMADHENU MATA



In Hindu mythology, Kamadhenu (Sanskrit: कामधेनु, pronounced [kaməðenu]) was a divine cow who was believed to be the mother of all cows. Like her daughter Nandini, she could grant any wish for the true seeker. Kamadhenu provided Vasishta with his needs for the sacrifices. Kamadhenu (kama-dhenu, 'wish-cow'), was a miraculous cow of plenty who could give her owner whatever he desired.
The cow stands for prosperity—as does Lakṣmī (see Lakṣmī), the wife of Viṣṇu (see Viṣṇu). Kāmadhenu is especially associated with brahmans (see Brahmans) and their “wealth,” because she is the producer of the milk and the clarified butter, the offerings traditionally placed on the sacrificial fire.

Kamadhenu, the sacred cow which grants all wishes and desires, is an integral part of Hindu mythology. This divine cow, which lives in swargalok (heaven), emerged from the ocean of milk (ksheerasagar) at the time of samudramanthan (the great churning of the ocean by the gods (suras) and gemons (asuras). It was presented to the seven sages by the Gods, and in course of time came into the possession of Sage Vasishta.
Kamadhenu's complexion is like the white clouds. Every part of cow's body has a religious significance. Its four legs symbolize the four Vedas, and its teats the four Purusharthas. Its horns symbolize the gods, its face symbolize the sun and the moon, its shoulders Agni (the god of fire), and its legs the Himalayas

Kamadhenu is also well-known through its other five forms: Nanda, Sunanda, Surabhi, Susheela and Sumana.  

Thursday

Nandni Mata

Posted by bhavi

Nandni Mata



Nandni Mata is a Hindu goddess. The name Nandni (sometimes written Nandini) is another name for durga, which means "daughter".

Nandni Mata is also called Nandore Ma in the Vagadi language. According to ancient Hindu epics, Nandni Mata was a daughter of Yashoda in the Dwapad era, and was killed by Kansh. Mostly she is worshipped at the Navratri festival. Nandni Mata appears in several Vedic hymns and is also described in the eleventh chapter of the book Durga Saptmi. The hymn also associates her with Yashoda’s daughter .

Nandni Mata has been regarded as Pavagh Devi of Gujrat in Vagad. An Adivasi folk dance called "garba" is also devoted to Nandni Mata. She is equally revered by Hindus, Jains and the Buddhists in the Vagad.

Nandni Mata Temple is very famous in the Banswara district of Rajasthan. It is 15 km from Banswara, situated on the state highway near Barodiya town. The main temple is located on top of the hills near Barodiya village in Vagad. Many myths and rituals centre on the black stone statue here some centuries ago which was later destroyed by demolishers, and is now replaced by the new beautiful idol.

BABA RAMDEVPIR

Posted by bhavi

BABA RAMDEVPIR


Baba-2

Ramdevji is a folk–deity of Rajasthan in India. He was a saint of the fourteenth century who devoted his life to the upliftment of the downtrodden.

The story, as derived from folklore, is thus. King Ajmal was the king of Pokaran. His wife, Rani Mainade, was the daughter of the king of Jaisalmer. The couple was issueless for many years. Once day the king was on a tour of his kingdom. It was monsoon, yet the kingdom had not received any rainfall. On his tour, the king met a few farmers who were on their way to their farms to sow seeds. On seeing the king, they begun to return back to their homes. Surprised at this act, the king asked farmers the reason for their behaviour. When assured that no harm would come to them if they told the truth, the farmers told the king that they believed that seeing a barren king's face while on their way to their fields may cause their crops to fail, and therefore they wanted to return to their homes. King Ajmal was very sad on hearing this. Being a devotee of Shri Krishna, the king decided to go to the Lord's palace in Dwarika.

King Ajmal arrived at Dwarika and prayed for many days. Ultimately, in sheer disappointment, he asked Krisna's idol the reason for deserving such sorrow. The idol did not respond to the king's repeated queries. Angered and raged at this, the king threw a dried laddu at the head of the idol. The priest of the temple, considering the king to be mad, asked the king to go to the mystic Dwarika to speak to the Lord. The mystic Dwarika swallowed by the sea many centuries ago, lay at the bed of the Arabian sea. The unfearing king dived into the sea to meet the Lord. Pleased at the king's dedication and faith, the Lord granted him a boon. The king asked for Lord Krishna to be born as his son. The Lord promised to take birth in the king's house. Soon thereafter, the royal couple were blessed with children.JAY BABA RAMDEVPIR

Ramdevji is considered to be an incarnation of Krishna.

As mentioned above, King Ajamal (Ajaishinh) married Queen Mainade, the daughter of Pamji Bhati of Chhahan Baru village. The childless king went to Dwarika and pled with the Lord about his wish to have child like him. They had two sons, Viramdev and the younger Ramdev. Ramdev was born on Chaitra Shukla Panchami in V.S. 1409 at a place called Ramdevra or Runicha (Ranuja), some nine miles from Pokharan. Ramdevji was a Tanwar Rajput. He is considered to be the 72nd descendant of the Pandav King Arjun.

Muslims venerate Ramdevji as 'Ramshah Pir'. He was said to have had miraculous powers, and his fame reached far and wide. Legend has it that five Pirs (saints) from Mecca came to test Ramdevji's powers. After being convinced of his abilities, they paid their homage to him. Since then he is venerated by Muslims also as Ram Shah Pir or Rama Peer.

Ramdevji believed in the equality of all human beings, be they high or low, rich or poor. He helped the down-trodden by granting them their wishes. Baba Ramdev is often depicted on horseback. His worship crosses the Hindu-Muslim divide as well as the distinctions of caste. His followers include caste Hindus and the Dalits in modern-day Rajasthan, Gujarat and [[Madhya Pradesh, Mumbai,Delhi] and also in Sindh in Pakistan. Several Rajasthani melas (fairs or festivals) are held to commemorate him.

Ramdevji took samadhi on Bhadrapada Shukla Ekadashi in V.S. 1442 at the age of 33 years. Dalibai, his ardent follower, is also buried near his grave.

One day, young Ramdevji wanted to play with a toy horse. His father asked a toy maker to make one wooden horse, and for the purpose, gave him sandalwood and new cloth. The toy maker, however, stole most of the new cloth for his wife, and made the wodden horse from a piece of old cloth, with only a cover from new cloth. When Ramdev sat on the horse it began to fly and disappeared into the sky along with the child. Ramdev’s parents got angry with the toy maker and imprisoned him. Shortly afterwards, Ramdev came back along with the horse and accused the toymaker of cheating. The toy maker confessed his crime and begged for forgiveness. Ramdevji forgave him and accepted the horse. Wooden toy horses covered with cloth are among the most popular offerings at the temple dedicated to him.

“24 Banis” are considered as famous literature composed by Ramdevji. Many poets and followers like Harji Bhati, Raja Mansinh, Likhmauji Mali, Vijoji Sani, Hiranand Mali, Devshi Mali and Rani Rupande had composed Falk lores on Ramdevji which are still sung by his followers.

Apart from Rajasthan, Baba Ramdevji or Ram Dev Pir has a strong Hindu following in Kathiawar, Gujarat. There are many temples dedicated to him. People from all stratas of society worship him. A mystical festival, called Mandap, is also held in villages across Kathiawar to worship him. The whole affair is funded by the villagers. The highlight of the festival is an event in which a long (almost 60 feet or more in height) wooden log, called the Sthambh, is decorated and laid on the ground with a loose base, with eight ropes tied to it from eight directions. Several rites and rituals are performed for about a month. At a certain time and date, the Sthambh stands up. Very mysteriously and strangely, the Sthambh stands up on its own, without any support. The eight ropes are loosely tied in eight nails that are driven in the ground. Lakhs of devotees flock this mandap to have a darshan of the event. The Sthambh stand erect for exactly a day, and returns back to its position 24 hours later in the same fashion. It is believed that RamDev Pir himself appears in the Sthambh.

Saturday

Yama Raja

Posted by bhavi

Yama Raja





Yama (Sanskrit: यम), also known as Yamarāja (यमराज) in India, Shinje (གཤིན་རྗེ།) in Tibet, Yanluowang (閻羅王) or simply Yan (閻) in China, and Enma Dai-Ō (閻魔大王) in Japan, is the lord of death, first recorded in the Vedas. The name Yanluo is a shortened Chinese transliteration of the Sanskrit term Yama Rājā, or "King Yama". Enma Dai-Ō is a further transliteration, meaning "Great King Yama", where Enma means Yama, Enma-Ō means Yama Rājā and Enma Dai-Ō would be equivalent to Yama Mahārāja.



Yama is a Lokapāla and an Aditya. In art, he is depicted with green or red skin, red clothes, and riding a water buffalo. He holds a loop of rope in his left hand with which he pulls the soul from the corpse. He is the son of Surya (Sun) and twin brother of Yami, or Yamuna, traditionally the first human pair in the Vedas. He was also worshiped as a son of Vivasvat and Saranya. He is one of the Guardians of the directions and represents the south. He reports to Lord Shiva the Destroyer, an aspect of Trimurti. Three hymns (10, 14, and 35) in the Rig Veda Book 10 are addressed to him. There is a one of a kind temple in Srivanchiyam, Tamil Nadu, India, dedicated to Yama.

The Vedic Yama, with certain changes of function, was the basis for the Buddhist Yama, judge of the dead, who presides over the Buddhist Hells. The Buddhist Yama became an integral part of Chinese and Japanese mythology. Although ultimately based on the god Yama of the Hindu Vedas, the Buddhist Yama has developed different myths and different functions from the Hindu deity.

Yama's abode
Naraka (Hindu)
Main article: Naraka (Hinduism)

Naraka in Hinduism, is compared to the Abrahamic concept of Hell. However, Naraka in Hinduism is not equivalent to Hell in Christian faith. Naraka is only a purgatory where the soul gets purified of sin by sufferings. In Hindu myth, there are many hells, and Yama, Lord of Justice, sends human beings after death for appropriate punishment. Even Mukti-yogyas (souls eligible for mukti or moksha), and Nitya-samsarins (forever transmigrating ones in Dvaita theology) can experience Naraka for expiation.
Naraka (Buddhist)
Main article: Naraka (Buddhism)

Naraka is usually translated into English as "hell" or "purgatory". A Naraka differs from the hells of western religions in two respects. First, beings are not sent to Naraka as the result of a divine judgment and punishment; second, the length of a being's stay in a Naraka is not eternal, though it is usually very long. Instead, a being is born into a Naraka as a direct result of his or her previous karma (actions of body, speech and mind), and resides there for a finite length of time until his karma has exhausted its cumulate effect.
Di Yu (Chinese mythology) and Jigoku (Japanese mythology)
Main article: Di Yu and Jigoku

Chinese Di Yu, Japanese Jigoku, literally "earth prison", is the realm of the dead or "hell" in Chinese mythology and Japanese mythology. It is based upon the Buddhist concept of Naraka combined with local afterlife beliefs. Incorporating ideas from Taoism and Buddhism as well as traditional religion in China, Di Yu is a kind of purgatory place which serves not only to punish but also to renew spirits ready for their next incarnation. Jigoku is similar, with Shinto concepts. These names are interchangeable with the concept of Naraka.
Related concepts
Yama and Ymir
Main article: Ymir

In a disputable etymology, W. Meid (1992) has linked the names Yama (reconstructed in Proto-Indo-European as *yemos) and the name of the primeval Norse frost giant Ymir, which can be reconstructed in Proto-Germanic as *umijaz or *jumijaz, in the latter case possibly deriving from PIE *ym̩yos, from the root yem "twin". In his myth, however, Ymir is not a twin, and only shares with Yama the characteristics of being primeval and mortal. However, Ymir is a hermaphrodite and engenders the race of giants.



Yama in Iranian mythology
Main article: Jamshid

The parallel character in the Iranian mythology of Zoroastrianism is known as Yima Xšaēta in the Zoroastrian scripture of the Avesta. The pronunciation "Yima" is peculiar to the Avestan dialect; in most Iranian dialects, including Old Persian, the name would have been "Yama". In the Avesta, the emphasis is on Yima/Yama's character as one of the first mortals and as a great king of men. Over time, *Yamaxšaita was transformed into Jamšēd or Jamshid, celebrated as the greatest of the early Shāhs of the world.
Yama in Javanese

There is Yamadipati in Javanese culture, especially in wayang. The word adipati means ruler or commander. When Hinduism first came to Java, Yama was still the same as Yama in Hindu myth. Later, as Islam replaced Hinduism as the majority religion of Java, Yama was demystified by Walisanga, who ruled at that time. So, in Javanese, Yama became a new character. He is the son of Sanghyang Ismaya and Dewi Sanggani. In the Wayang legend, Yamadipati married Dewi Mumpuni. Unfortunately, Dewi Mumpuni fell in love with Nagatatmala, son of Hyang Anantaboga, who rules the earth. Dewi Mumpuni eventually left Yamadipati, however.

Lord Kuber / Kubera

Posted by bhavi


Lord Kuber / Kubera



Lord Kuber - God of wealth and material possessions

Lord Kuber / Kubera is god of wealth and material possessions. He is a great Yaksha and a humble devotee of Lord Shiva. There are many legends of Lord Kuber but the one most famous among them is when Lord Vishnu/ Balaji/ Venkateswara at Tirupati asked him for a loan to marry Goddess Laxmi. It is believed that till today Lord Balaji is paying interest on that loan. Devotees try and do their bit and donate generously to help Lord Balaji.
 
The next legend of Lord Kubera is related to Lord Ganesh. One day Lord Kubera went to Mount Kailash to seek the blessings of Shiva. As he was conceited, he decided to invite Lord Shiva for a feast at his magnificent city of Alakpuri. Lord Shiva was aware of his narcissistic quality and politely backed out of this invitation and said that his son, Lord Ganesh would be more than happy to join in the festivities. But Kubera was made aware that Lord Ganesh was a connoisseur of good food and had a voracious appetite. Kubera beamed with over confidence and was convinced that Lord Ganesh’s hunger would be easily satiated.

Kubera took little Lord Ganesh with him to his glorious city and offered Him a ceremonial bath, then adorned Him in exquisite clothing. Our Lord was then taken to a splendid arena where the feast was arranged. The royal attendants served Lord Ganesh and He started eating. He relished on everything that was offered and continued gobbling on a wide variety of delicacies. The food that was prepared for Kubera’s other esteemed guests were also offered. But nothing seemed to satisfy Him and He kept waiting for the attendants to dole out more portions. In the meantime, the attendants hurried to arrange more quantities of food. Impatient, Lord Ganesh started consuming the plates. Slowly, He reached for the decorations and the furniture. Kubera was at his wits end. He prostrated in front of little Lord Ganesh and begged Him to stop this and spare his palace. Lord Ganesh with his little, innocent eyes looked at Kubera and said that He was still very hungry. Until He was offered more food, He said that He would continue eating whatever that was in front of Him.
Kubera frantically rushed to Mount Kailash and begged Lord Shiva to give him a solution. Lord Shiva smiled and handed him a fistful of roasted rice and instructed Kubera to offer this with humility. By the time Kubera managed to reach his kingdom, Lord Ganesh was on the verge of swallowing up the entire city of Alakpuri. Kubera paid obeisance and humbly offered the roasted rice. This satiated Lord Ganesh’s hunger and He was pleased. 

Qualities like humility and respect are the unbeatable duo that can change an unattainable situation to an accomplishment, if one knows how to use them sincerely in their undertakings. Materialistic possessions blind people with arrogance but this veil can be lifted when one learns to be humble and remembers that everything he owns is because of His blessings.


Batuk Bhairav

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Batuk Bhairav

bhairav

Kaal Bhairav

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Kaal Bhairav

Kal Bhairav

Kaal Bhairav of Ujjain
Priest Pouring alcohol in the mouth of Kaal Bhairav

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